FAQ: Website Help

  1. Can I connect two Genographic Project IDs to one e-mail address?

  2. I’ve had my DNA tested through other genetic testing sites like Ancestry.com and 23andMe. How do my Genographic Project results differ from theirs, and why?

  3. Why has my paternal haplogroup changed?

  4. Why has the design of my results changed?

  5. How do I locate my Genographic Project Participant ID?

  6. What is my Participant ID for?

  7. What do I do if I’ve lost my Participant ID?

  8. Why am I being asked to register on the website?

  9. Why is some information already filled in under My Profile?

  10. What are Expert Options?

  11. Why are Who Am I and Our Story grayed-out in the website navigation when I get my results?

  12. Can I share my results with my social networks?

Answers

  1. Can I connect two Genographic Project IDs to one e-mail address?

    You can connect one first-phase Genographic Project ID and one Geno 2.0 Project ID to a single e-mail address (they should belong to the same user, as it connects these kits in our database). We do not currently offer the ability to connect more Project IDs to a single email address, and we are investigating offering this functionality in the future. Commitment to the privacy of our participant’s results is a priority.

  2. I’ve had my DNA tested through other genetic testing sites like Ancestry.com and 23andMe. How do my Genographic Project results differ from theirs, and why?

    The Genographic Project is a research project of the National Geographic Society, which encompasses work carried out by our scientific team to elucidate new patterns of human migration, as well as public testing through the participation kits. Our testing focuses on deep ancestry from an anthropological perspective. It is not primarily a genealogy testing service, such as that offered by Ancestry.com, although you do have the option of seeing how you are related to other participants in the Our Story section. 23andMe is primarily a medically focused testing company, examining markers that are associated with disease risk. While they do offer some insights into ancestry, that is not their primary focus. The genetic technology we use for our testing is a custom-designed genotyping chip optimized for the study of ancestry, with far more Y-chromosome and mtDNA markers than are available with any other test. Our autosomal markers are similarly optimized for inferring ancestry, rather than medical testing, and we feel that it is the best technology available for this purpose.

  3. Why has my paternal haplogroup changed?

    Your haplogroup hasn’t changed—it has just become more precise as we’ve added new markers to the tree. When there were only a dozen or so sub-branches in the haplogroup R branch of the tree, for instance, using designations such as R1b1a made more sense. Now that there are hundreds of sub-branches in R alone, with more being added regularly as we test more people with the GenoChip, it’s much easier to designate people as being a member of a broad branch, such as R, and then to designate their terminal marker on the current tree.

  4. Why has the design of my results changed?

    The Genographic Project team will frequently update and improve the results display. An update was made to the main report story view and the Your Map view in mid-November 2012. This update also included a nomenclature change to the paternal line, to show the haplogroup in a different format (example: R-M164 instead of R1b1a). Your results have not changed, but the new view will provide more content, a faster experience, and an updated naming convention for male haplogroups.

  5. How do I locate my Genographic Project Participant ID?

    Each Geno 2.0 kit displays the Participant ID in two locations—on the inside front cover of the kit that you received, and in the upper right corner of Step 3 of the Quick Start Guide & Consent Form that was included in your Geno 2.0 kit.

    The kit from the first phase of the project displays the Participant ID (also referred to as a “GPID”) on the inside front cover of the kit, and in the upper left corner of the Consent panel and Information panel on the Consent to DNA Testing form that was included in your kit.

     

  6. What is my Participant ID for?

    A Genographic Project Participant ID is a randomly generated, anonymous, nonsequential, alphanumeric code assigned to your DNA sample for processing and analysis.

    PARTICIPANTS MUST HAVE THEIR PARTICIPANT ID IN ORDER TO ACCESS THEIR RESULTS.  If you lose your Participant ID we cannot recover it for you or provide you with any other means of accessing the results of your participation unless you have previously chosen to register your Participant ID on the website.

     

  7. What do I do if I’ve lost my Participant ID?

    If you lose your Participant ID and have not previously registered it on the site, you will not be able to access your results. Participant IDs are randomly and anonymously assigned to protect confidentiality, and National Geographic does not know which Participant ID has been sent to you in your kit.

  8. Why am I being asked to register on the website?

    When you log in to the website to access your results, you will be given the opportunity to register your Participant ID. Registration is not required for you to access your results. It is your option to more actively participate in enhanced activities offered in Geno 2.0. It will allow us to recover your Participant ID if you ever lose it, send you email alerts about the status of your results, and communicate to you any important new information.

    If you choose to register, your personally identifiable information will be linked to your Participant ID, and your genetic information in our database will no longer be anonymous to National Geographic. By registering, you are allowing National Geographic to link the DNA sample you sent to us and the genetic tests we have performed to any personally identifiable information that you choose to provide to us. Future use and disclosure of this information will be subject to the Genographic Project’s Privacy Policy and any future permissions that you give us. In addition, National Geographic may disclose participant information when doing so is required by law.

  9. Why is some information already filled in under My Profile?

    If the family history fields are already filled in, it is because our database has detected that you previously submitted this survey data.

  10. What are Expert Options?

    Throughout the Genographic Project website, you will see content labeled as “Expert Options.” The Genographic Project contains layers of information that are intended for scientists and enthusiasts who are highly knowledgeable about genealogy and genetics, and who might want to use the information in that section to increase their understanding of their results or to further investigate their ancestry outside the Genographic Project.

    This information might be the specific marker names used by scientists to describe the various branches on the human family tree, or more elaborate data maps showing highly detailed migration routes.

    We will be expanding these areas in the coming months as we’re able to display more and more of the data and learnings from the project.

  11. Why are Who Am I and Our Story grayed-out in the website navigation when I get my results?

    If you participated in the first phase of the Genographic Project, the type of data revealed in the Who Am I section of results is not available for that earlier test, and the Our Story community features of the new website are not available.

  12. Can I share my results with my social networks?

    Yes! In the upper-right corner of each of your results pages is a yellow “Share” button. Clicking this button will allow you to share your unique Genographic Project infographic via Facebook, Twitter, and Google+. You can also email the infographic, download a jpg or pdf of the image, or embed it into a web page. View a sample infographic.

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